Comic Book Review: Squadron Supreme #1

One of my favorite series of all time was ‘the Authority,’ which spawned out of Warren Ellis’ sublime run on ‘Stormwatch.’ The Authority was about a team of super-powered individuals which answered to no one, and whose own judgement guided their actions on a global scale. That power, and that lack of accountability, made for an exquisitely good read, but ever since the book was shifted away from the top-shelf talent it became stale and uninteresting.

seriously, go read the authority if you haven't (Image courtesy of DC Comics

seriously, go read the authority if you haven't (Image courtesy of DC Comics

DC had hoped to recapture the magic when it started the New 52 – they brought together many of the same characters (Midnighter, Apollo, Swift, Jack Hawksmoor), the incredible dimension-hopping ship, and simply called the book ‘Stormwatch’... which was a completely neutered version of the Authority and wasn’t remotely compelling.

HOWEVER, of all publishers, Marvel has taken that archetype and created something that just may fill that Authority-sized void in our hearts.

James Robinson, he of Starman and Airboy fame, takes different iterations of the Squadron Supreme – including the Nighthawk from J. Michael Straczynski’s fantastic MAX-title ‘Supreme Power’ – and place them all together in the NADS Marvel. It’s the standard lineup of Hyperion, Blur, Nighthawk, Power Princess, and Doc Spectrum, and they take on one of the men responsible for the destruction of a reality or two: Namor.

Alex Ross covers certainly don't hurt (image courtesy of Marvel comics)

Alex Ross covers certainly don't hurt (image courtesy of Marvel comics)

Now, one of the solicitations gave away the outcome of this fight, and it’s a crying shame; The end of the battle is shocking if you didn’t know it was coming, and it sets the table for this team to be that Authority-like presence in the Marvel Universe. The take no prisoners, right anything they perceive as wrong, and do it all with a strong sense of self-entitlement. It’s wonderful.

the nighthawk design is brilliant (Image courtesy of Marvel Comics

the nighthawk design is brilliant (Image courtesy of Marvel Comics

The art team of Leonard Kirk (pencils), Paul Neary (inks), and Frank Martin (colors) knock it out of the park – they’re able to touch on some Bryan-Hitch-level epic action in the fight against Namor and the Atlanteans, and the panel depicting each Squadron member with their prior team was genius.

Frankly, I was mildly interested in this book and Karnak in the NADS Marvel launch, and this is just as good as the universally-adored Inhuman monk’s book. I can’t wait to see how Thundra fits in, as well as the mawfuggin’ reveal at the end. 

This book was so damn surprising I fell in love. I also may or may not have purchased the Wu Tang Hip-Hop variant. 

 

.....which I totally did. 

LOWDOWN: 7 out of 10 pelvic thrusts. I'm curious as to where this story is going, but the plot and art have definitely put this book on my pull list.