Comic Review: Spawn #262

Not gonna lie: the last issue of Spawn I bought off the shelves was issue number 10. You do the math here, it's too painful for me.

However, Seeing "Erik Larsen" and "Todd McFarlane" adoring the top of the cover so proudly just unleashed my inner child into a chaotic frenzy. Larsen and McFarlane do all the heavy lifting in this book (penciling, inking, plot, script, layouts), and it harkens back to a simpler time when all Spawn had to do was present some kickass spiritual shit and Spawn himself kicking ass. 

Lucky for me, that's just what this issue is. 

In this conclusion of the Satan Saga Wars, Satan finally had enough of Spawn's shit and he held original Spawn Al Simmons' wife hostage, forcing him to give up the symbiotic, powerful Spawn suit. Not taking kindly to Satan's dick move, Al tracks down the Sword of God and goes to settle shit. Naturally, something more epic happens to open this issue, and it's great:

GOD DROPS DOWN TO RUMBLE.

It was just fucking perfect: God comes down to call Satan on his bullshit, and during their whole ordeal Al figures out a way out of this mess, or so he tells his wife Wanda. First, they need to get the spirit of their unborn baby (HELL YEAH THIS IS METAL) from a demon. They do, God and Satan quit their beefing when Al gives up the suit, and he makes a sacrifice to free Wanda. But then Wanda makes a sacrifice to free Al's potential. Then Al outsmarts all their asses in the end. How? READ THIS BOOK!

This isn't false joy: I really enjoyed this issue. It was just exquisite fun to see two of Image's founders team up to deliver some over-the-top fun: all the dialogue is operatic in scope, all the action is epic, and the myriad twists and turns the two gentlemen provide make this eminently re-readable. FCO Plancenscia handles the colors deftly, ramping up Larsen's & McFarlane's art to an unearthly high. 

It didn't feel hokey that Spawn outwitted the devil AND God. The closure is real, and the promise of a new direction for Spawn is enticing. This was a fun book that harkened back to the few good things comics gave us in the 90's, and for that I'm grateful.

LOWDOWN: 8 out of 10 pelvic thrusts. I love good nostalgia, and the two industry titans provided. Actually excited about the new direction of the book.