Comic Review: The Flash #7

Damn, Flash No. 7 from writer Joshua Williamson and artist Carmine Di Giandomenico is a hard-hitting emotional roller-coaster of a ride. 

Barry's happy-go-lucky, optimistic demeanor is still long gone, and in its place is this bearded, angry, secluded version of himself. Godspeed has killed some of his underlings, and his newfound love interest. 

spoilers kick in after this image from issue seven. 

And on top of that, Godspeed is actually one of Barry's closest friends, Detective August Heart. August was hellbent on bringing his brand of justice down on his brother's killer, and he took it to extreme levels when he started stealing all of the newfound speedster's powers, all while accidentally killing them. 

The two former friends are still fighting, while Godspeed -- August -- still refers and speaks to The Flash like they are friends. They are parallel opposites all of a sudden. 

Williamson wrote one hell of a depressing issue, as we watch another relationship of Barry's fall apart as he once again is left trying to stop another speedster from resorting to the death penalty. 

There is a lot of young Wally West development in this issue, if that's what you have been waiting for. So, cheers to that! 

The two argue back and forth about their tactics and principal and it just sinks in, that no matter what, Barry Allen can never enjoy his life. 

This is where Godspeed poses the question: Is Barry's unhappiness due to the fact that he lets his enemies live out their lives in Iron Heights? That's where I'll leave the plot points. Williamson has changed the tone of this series seemingly in the blink of an eye without taking anything away from the quality. 

Allow me to gush over Di Giandomenico's art in this issue, and series overall, for a moment if you will. I've praised Williamson's Speed Force mythos up the wall and back, but without Di Giandomenico, it would not hit as hard.

That's not a knock on the writer, but just me singing the praises of the artist. The in-your-face but somehow not overwhelming lightning bolts when The Flash and Godspeed are dueling are just fantastic. I can imagine it's not that easy to put so much frenetic action on the pages without having it distract the readers. Needless to say, the art is freaking special. It's easily some of my favorite artistic work on a Flash series of all-time. You can discreetly tell how much of an emotional wreck Barry is just by noticing the subtle facial hair under his mask, the pain in his eyes when talking to his confused underlings.

Rating: A very solid 9.5/10 I've praised Joshua Williamson's Speed Force mythos up the wall and back, but without Carmine Di Giandomenico, it would not hit as hard. That's not a knock on the writer, but just me singing the praises of the artist. This is a hard-hitting, depressing ride of an issue in what is shaping up to be one of the most enticing Barry Allen Flash arcs in some time.